10 Best Low Fat Dog Treats for Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis is a serious condition that can cause significant discomfort and even death in dogs if left untreated. It is characterized by inflammation of the pancreas, a gland responsible for producing hormones and enzymes necessary for digestion. Proper nutrition is crucial for managing pancreatitis in dogs, and one important aspect of this is choosing the right treats.

Low-fat treats for dogs with pancreatitis

What is the best low-fat treat for dogs with pancreatitis?

Here are some of the top options for low-fat treats for dogs with pancreatitis:

1. Zuke’s Mini Naturals Training Treats

Pros:

  • These treats have a low fat content, making them a great option for dogs with pancreatitis who need to maintain a low fat diet.
  • These treats are made with natural ingredients, including real meat and fruits, which can be beneficial for dogs with sensitive stomachs or food allergies.
  • The mini size of these treats makes them easy to use for training and rewards, without overfeeding your dog.
  • Zuke’s Mini Naturals come in a variety of flavors, including chicken, beef, and rabbit, which can help keep your dog interested in their treats.

Cons:

  • These treats are on the higher end of the price spectrum compared to other low-fat dog treat options.
  • While the variety of flavors can be a plus, some dogs may not be able to tolerate certain protein sources.
  • These treats contain grain, so they may not be suitable for dogs with grain allergies.

2. Blue Buffalo Soft-Moist Dog Treats

Pros:

  • These treats are made with natural ingredients, such as whole grains and real meat, which provide essential nutrients for dogs without adding unnecessary fat to their diet.
  • They are soft and moist, making them easy to chew and swallow for dogs with sensitive stomachs or pancreatitis.
  • Blue Buffalo is a reputable brand known for producing high-quality, healthy pet food and treats.
  • These treats come in a variety of flavors, such as chicken, beef, and turkey, providing options for dogs with different taste preferences.

Cons:

  • Some customers have reported that the treats have a strong odor, which some dogs may not find appealing.
  • They are on the more expensive side compared to other dog treats on the market.
  • Some dogs may be allergic to certain ingredients used in the treats, so it is important to check the ingredient list before purchasing.

3. Wellness Soft Puppy Bites

Pros:

  • Made with natural ingredients, including real chicken as the first ingredient
  • Low in fat, with only 3% fat content per treat
  • Soft texture makes them easy to chew and swallow for dogs with digestive issues
  • Grain-free and gluten-free, making them a good option for dogs with food sensitivities
  • Small size makes them perfect for training or as a reward for good behavior

Cons:

  • May be more expensive than other low fat dog treat options
  • Some dogs may not find the taste as appealing as other treat options
  • Some reviews have noted that the treats can be crumbly, making them messy to give to dogs

4. Stella & Chewy’s Freeze-Dried Raw Dinner Patties

Pros:

  • Made with high-quality, protein-rich ingredients such as chicken and turkey.
  • Freeze-dried to preserve nutrients and flavor.
  • Grain-free and gluten-free, making it a good option for dogs with food sensitivities.
  • Low in fat, making it a suitable option for dogs with pancreatitis.
  • Convenient and easy to serve as a complete meal or as a topper for kibble.

Cons:

  • Expensive compared to other dog treat options.
  • Not suitable for dogs with severe food allergies, as it contains poultry ingredients.
  • May not be as palatable to picky eaters.

5. Greenies Dental Chews

Pros:

  • Greenies Dental Chews are specifically designed to clean teeth and freshen breath, making them a great choice for dogs with pancreatitis who may struggle with dental issues due to their condition.
  • They are made with natural ingredients and are free from artificial preservatives, colors, and flavors.
  • They are low in fat, with only 3% fat per treat, making them a safer option for dogs with pancreatitis who need to avoid high-fat foods.
  • They come in a variety of sizes to suit different breeds and sizes of dogs.

Cons:

  • Greenies Dental Chews can be quite hard and may not be suitable for dogs with sensitive teeth or mouths.
  • They can be quite expensive when compared to other dog treats on the market.
  • Some dogs may not be interested in the taste or texture of Greenies Dental Chews, making it difficult to get them to eat them.

6. Pumpkin and Banana treats

These treats are easy to make and only require two ingredients – pumpkin puree and ripe bananas. Simply mash the bananas and mix in some pumpkin puree, then roll the mixture into small balls and freeze for a tasty and healthy treat. Pumpkin is high in fiber and can help regulate digestion, while bananas are a good source of potassium and can help reduce inflammation.

Pros:

  • Pumpkin is a great source of fiber and is known to aid in digestion. It can also help to alleviate diarrhea and constipation in dogs with pancreatitis.
  • Banana is a natural source of potassium, which can be beneficial for dogs with pancreatitis as it can help to regulate blood pressure and heart function.
  • Both pumpkin and banana are low in fat and calories, making them a great option for dogs on a low fat diet.
  • These treats are also a great source of vitamins and minerals, including vitamin A and potassium.

Cons:

  • Some dogs may not be a fan of the taste of pumpkin or banana, making it difficult to get them to eat these treats.
  • These treats may not be suitable for dogs with certain food allergies or sensitivities, as they contain common allergens such as wheat and soy.
  • Some dogs may have difficulty digesting these treats, which can lead to stomach upset or diarrhea.

7. Chicken and Rice treats

Another simple recipe that can be easily made at home is chicken and rice treats. Simply cook some brown rice and shred some cooked chicken breast, then mix the two together and roll into small balls or press into a silicone treat mold. These treats are easy on the digestive system and can provide much-needed protein for dogs with pancreatitis.

Pros:

  • Chicken is a lean protein source, making it a good option for dogs on a low fat diet.
  • Rice is a low-fat grain that is easy to digest and can provide energy without putting too much strain on the pancreas.
  • These treats are often made with simple ingredients, making them a good option for dogs with food sensitivities.

Cons:

  • Some chicken and rice dog treats may contain added fats or oils, so it’s important to check the ingredient list before purchasing.
  • These treats may not be suitable for dogs with severe pancreatitis, as they may still contain some fat and may not provide enough nutrition.

8. Blueberry and Oat treats

For a tasty and antioxidant-rich treat, try mixing together some rolled oats, blueberries, and a little bit of coconut oil. Roll the mixture into small balls or press it into a silicone treat mold and freeze it for a healthy and delicious snack. Blueberries are high in antioxidants and can help reduce inflammation, while oats are a good source of fiber and can help regulate digestion.

Pros:

  • These treats are low in fat, making them a great option for dogs with pancreatitis who need to maintain a low-fat diet.
  • The inclusion of blueberries provides antioxidants, which can help support overall health.
  • Oats are a source of dietary fiber, which can aid in digestion and bowel regularity.

Cons:

  • These treats may not be suitable for dogs with food allergies or sensitivities to oats or blueberries.
  • Some dogs may not find the taste appealing, making it difficult to use as a reward or treat.

9. Carrot and Peanut Butter treats

Another tasty treat idea for dogs with pancreatitis is carrots and peanut butter. Simply shred some carrots and mix in a spoonful of natural peanut butter, then roll into small balls or press into a silicone treat mold and freeze. Carrots are high in fiber and can help regulate digestion, while peanut butter is a good source of protein and healthy fats. Just be sure to use a natural peanut butter without added sugar or salt.

Pros:

  • Carrots are a low calorie and low fat option for dogs. They are also a good source of fiber and vitamins A and K.
  • Peanut butter is a protein-rich treat that can be a great option for dogs who need to maintain muscle mass. However, it is important to make sure the peanut butter used does not contain added sugar or salt.
  • These treats are easy to make at home, giving you control over the ingredients used.
  • Many dogs find the combination of carrot and peanut butter to be a tasty treat.

Cons:

  • Some dogs may be allergic to peanuts, so it is important to check with your veterinarian before introducing these treats.
  • Peanut butter can be high in calories, so it should be used in moderation for dogs with pancreatitis.
  • Carrots can be tough to digest for some dogs, so they may need to be grated or cooked before being used as a treat.

10. Sweet Potato and Apple treats

For a sweet and healthy treat, try mixing together some cooked and mashed sweet potato with some grated apple. Roll the mixture into small balls or press it into a silicone treat mold and freeze it for a tasty snack that is high in fiber and can help regulate digestion.

Pros:

  • Sweet potatoes are a great source of vitamins and minerals, including Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and potassium. They also contain antioxidants that can help to boost the immune system.
  • Apples are a great source of fiber and also contain antioxidants. They are also low in calories and fat.
  • Both sweet potatoes and apples are easy to digest, making them a great option for dogs with pancreatitis.
  • These treats are also a great option for dogs that are overweight or obese, as they are low in calories and fat.

Cons:

  • Some dogs may not be as interested in these treats as they are in more traditional dog treats.
  • These treats may not be as convenient as other options, as they require some preparation before they can be given to your dog.
  • They may not be suitable for dogs with certain allergies or dietary restrictions, such as gluten allergies.

How long does it take for a dog to fully recover from pancreatitis?

The length of time it takes for a dog to fully recover from pancreatitis depends on several factors, including the underlying cause of the condition, the severity of the inflammation, and the effectiveness of the treatment.

In most cases, dogs with mild to moderate pancreatitis will begin to show signs of improvement within a few days of starting treatment, and they may fully recover within a few weeks.

However, dogs with severe pancreatitis may take longer to recover, and they may require hospitalization and intensive treatment. In some cases, dogs with severe pancreatitis may develop complications, such as organ failure or sepsis, which can prolong their recovery time.

Can a dog live a long life with pancreatitis?

Some dogs with pancreatitis are able to live a long and healthy life with the condition, while others may experience more severe symptoms and complications. The severity of pancreatitis can vary greatly between dogs, and the underlying cause of the condition can also impact a dog’s prognosis.

Dogs with mild to moderate pancreatitis that receive prompt and appropriate treatment are generally able to recover fully and return to a normal lifestyle. These dogs may need to make dietary and lifestyle changes to prevent future episodes of pancreatitis, but they can still live a long and healthy life.

However, dogs with severe pancreatitis or underlying health conditions that increase their risk of pancreatitis may have a shorter lifespan. These dogs may require ongoing treatment and monitoring to manage their condition, and they may be at risk of developing complications, such as organ failure or sepsis.

It’s important to consult with a veterinarian and follow their recommendations for treatment and care to help your dog live a long and healthy life.

What foods make pancreatitis worse in dogs?

Here are some foods that can worsen pancreatitis in dogs:

  • High-fat foods: Foods that are high in fat can put extra strain on the pancreas, causing it to become inflamed. This includes foods like bacon, sausage, and hamburger.
  • Processed foods: Processed foods often contain added fats and preservatives, which can be hard for the pancreas to digest. This includes foods like kibble and canned dog food.
  • Dairy products: Dogs are lactose intolerant, which means they have a hard time digesting milk and other dairy products. This can cause the pancreas to become inflamed.
  • Human food scraps: Many human foods, such as fried foods, sweets, and fatty meats, can be harmful to dogs. These foods can worsen pancreatitis in dogs.
  • High-carb foods: Foods that are high in carbohydrates can also put extra strain on the pancreas. This includes foods like bread, pasta, and potatoes.

Why are so many dogs getting pancreatitis?

There are many potential reasons why dogs may develop pancreatitis. Some common causes include:

  • Obesity: Overweight dogs are at a higher risk of developing pancreatitis, as excess fat in the body can trigger the release of digestive enzymes that can cause pancreatitis.
  • High-fat diet: Dogs that consume a diet that is high in fat are at a higher risk of developing pancreatitis, as high-fat foods can trigger the release of digestive enzymes that can cause pancreatitis.
  • Medications: Some medications, such as corticosteroids and certain antibiotics, can increase the risk of pancreatitis.
  • Genetic factors: Some breeds of dogs, such as Miniature Schnauzers and Yorkshire Terriers, are more likely to develop pancreatitis due to genetic factors.
  • Other health conditions: Dogs with other health conditions, such as diabetes or Cushing’s disease, are at a higher risk of developing pancreatitis.

It’s important to consult with a veterinarian if you suspect that your dog may have pancreatitis. They can assess your dog’s health and determine the underlying cause of the condition, and recommend the appropriate treatment.

Conclusion of low-fat treats for dogs with pancreatitis

When it comes to managing pancreatitis in dogs, one key aspect is ensuring they are on a low-fat diet. High-fat content in food can exacerbate inflammation and worsen symptoms of pancreatitis. However, this doesn’t mean your pup has to miss out on treats altogether. There are a variety of low-fat options available for dogs with pancreatitis.

One popular option is frozen fruits and vegetables. Fruits like blueberries, strawberries, and banana slices make for a tasty treat, while vegetables like carrots, green beans, and cucumber can also be enjoyed. These treats are not only low in fat, but also provide important vitamins and minerals for overall health.

Another great option is lean proteins, such as boiled chicken or turkey breast. These treats are low in fat and provide valuable amino acids that support muscle and tissue health. Additionally, they can be easily cut into small pieces and used as training rewards.

Another option is low-fat cheese, such as cottage cheese or mozzarella. These treats are high in protein and calcium, but low in fat. However, it is important to note that dogs with pancreatitis should be given only small amounts of cheese as it can be quite difficult to digest.

Overall, there are a variety of low-fat options available for dogs with pancreatitis. By incorporating these treats into your pup’s diet, you can help manage their condition while still giving them something to enjoy. It is important to speak with your veterinarian before making any changes to your dog’s diet and to monitor their weight, appetite, and bowel movements closely.

HELP US PUT FOOD ON THE TABLE

Hannah Elizabeth is an English animal behavior author, having written for several online publications. With a degree in Animal Behaviour and over a decade of practical animal husbandry experience, Hannah's articles cover everything from pet care to wildlife conservation. When she isn't creating content for blog posts, Hannah enjoys long walks with her Rottweiler cross Senna, reading fantasy novels and breeding aquarium shrimp.

One Response

  1. Thank you so much for all this wonderful information! Our basset hound, Buddy just got home from a two night stay at an emergency vet and was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis.

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