Cerenia for Dogs Side Effects

Cerenia is a medication that is commonly prescribed for dogs to treat a variety of conditions, including vomiting and nausea. The active ingredient in Cerenia is maropitant, which is a neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist. This means that it works by blocking the action of a specific chemical in the brain called substance P, which is responsible for causing nausea and vomiting.

Common side effects of Cerenia include:

  • Loss of appetite: Some dogs may lose their appetite after taking Cerenia, but this is usually temporary and should resolve within a few days.
  • Diarrhea: Diarrhea is a common side effect of Cerenia, especially if the medication is administered at a high dose or for an extended period of time.
  • Constipation: Cerenia can also cause constipation, especially if the dog is dehydrated or if the medication is administered at a high dose.
  • Lethargy: Some dogs may become more tired or lethargic after taking Cerenia, but this is usually temporary and should resolve within a few days.

Serious side effects of Cerenia are rare, but they can occur. These include:

  • Blood in stool
  • Stomach ulcers
  • Breathing difficulties
  • Allergic reactions
  • Loss of coordination

It’s always recommended to consult with a veterinarian before administering any medication to your dog and it’s important to monitor your dog for any signs of side effects after administering Cerenia.

What is Cerenia for dogs used for?

One of the main uses of Cerenia for dogs is to prevent and treat acute vomiting. This can be caused by a variety of things, including motion sickness, changes in diet, and certain medications. Cerenia can be given to dogs before they are exposed to a potential trigger for vomiting, such as a car ride or a change in diet, to prevent the vomiting from occurring.

Another use of Cerenia for dogs is to treat chronic vomiting. This can be caused by conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, gastrointestinal cancer, and other chronic illnesses. Cerenia can be given to dogs on a regular basis to help control their vomiting symptoms and improve their overall quality of life.

In addition to its use as an anti-vomiting medication, Cerenia has also been found to be effective in the treatment of other conditions. For example, it has been shown to be effective in the treatment of pancreatitis in dogs. Pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition of the pancreas that can cause severe abdominal pain and vomiting. Cerenia can help to reduce inflammation and control the symptoms of pancreatitis.

Cerenia is typically administered as an oral tablet, but it is also available as an injectable solution. The dosage of Cerenia will vary depending on the condition being treated and the size of the dog. It is important to always follow the dosing instructions provided by your veterinarian and to not give your dog more or less than the recommended amount.

Does Cerenia make dogs sleepy?

According to a study published in the Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Cerenia was found to have a sedative effect in dogs. The study found that dogs treated with Cerenia had a significant decrease in activity levels compared to dogs that did not receive the medication. This decrease in activity was observed as early as 30 minutes after administering Cerenia and lasted for up to four hours.

Another study published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine found that Cerenia was effective in reducing vomiting in dogs with chronic kidney disease. The study also found that the majority of dogs treated with Cerenia did not experience any sedation or drowsiness. However, a small number of dogs did experience mild to moderate sedation, which resolved within a few hours.

It is important to note that the sedative effect of Cerenia may vary from dog to dog. Factors such as the dog’s individual sensitivity to the medication, the dosage, and the underlying health condition can all affect the likelihood of experiencing drowsiness or sedation.

If your dog is taking Cerenia, it is essential to monitor them for signs of sedation or drowsiness. If your dog appears to be excessively drowsy or lethargic, contact your veterinarian for advice. Additionally, it is crucial to follow your veterinarian’s instructions regarding the dosage and administration of Cerenia to minimize the risk of side effects.

Can Cerenia upset the dog’s stomach?

One of the most common side effects of Cerenia is stomach upset. This can manifest in a variety of ways, such as diarrhea, constipation, or loss of appetite. In some cases, the stomach upset may be mild and temporary, but in other cases, it may be more severe and persistent.

There are several factors that can contribute to stomach upset when using Cerenia. One of the most important is the dosage. If a dog is given too high of a dose, it can increase the risk of stomach upset. Additionally, if a dog has a pre-existing condition that affects the stomach, such as inflammatory bowel disease or pancreatitis, they may be more susceptible to stomach upset from Cerenia.

Another factor that can contribute to stomach upset is the duration of treatment. Cerenia is typically given for a short period of time, usually no more than a few days. However, if a dog is given Cerenia for an extended period, it can increase the risk of stomach upset.

In order to minimize the risk of stomach upset when using Cerenia, it is important to follow the recommended dosage and duration of treatment as directed by a veterinarian. Additionally, pet owners should be aware of any potential warning signs of stomach upset, such as vomiting, diarrhea, or loss of appetite, and report them to the veterinarian immediately.

Can Cerenia cause constipation in dogs?

According to a study published in the Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care, constipation is a common side effect of Cerenia in dogs. The study found that approximately 10% of dogs treated with Cerenia experienced constipation. The study also found that the risk of constipation was higher in dogs that were treated with higher doses of Cerenia.

There are several possible mechanisms by which Cerenia may cause constipation in dogs. One theory is that Cerenia may slow down the movement of food through the digestive tract, which can lead to constipation. Additionally, Cerenia may also decrease the amount of fluid in the intestines, which can make it more difficult for feces to pass through the digestive tract.

It is important to note that constipation is not a life-threatening side effect of Cerenia, but it can cause discomfort and distress in dogs. If your dog is experiencing constipation while taking Cerenia, it is important to speak with your veterinarian to determine the best course of action. Your veterinarian may recommend adjusting the dosage of Cerenia or prescribing a laxative to help relieve the constipation.

How long do Cerenia’s side effects last?

The length of time that Cerenia side effects last can vary depending on the individual animal and the dosage used. Common side effects of Cerenia include drowsiness, lack of energy, and decreased appetite. These side effects are usually mild and short-lived, lasting only a few hours to a day.

However, in some cases, the side effects of Cerenia may last longer. According to a study published in the Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, some dogs treated with Cerenia experienced side effects such as sedation and ataxia (lack of coordination) for up to two days after treatment. Another study published in the same journal found that some cats treated with Cerenia experienced drowsiness and decreased appetite for up to three days after treatment.

It is important to note that these studies were conducted using high doses of Cerenia and may not reflect the typical experience of animals treated with the medication. Additionally, any side effects that persist or worsen should be reported to a veterinarian.

Conclusion of Cerenia for dogs

Pros:

  • Cerenia is an FDA-approved medication for the treatment of vomiting in dogs.
  • It is effective at reducing nausea and vomiting caused by various conditions, including motion sickness, gastritis, and chemotherapy.
  • Cerenia is available in both oral and injectable forms, which can be administered at home or in a veterinary clinic.

Cons:

  • Cerenia can cause side effects such as drowsiness, decreased appetite, and diarrhea.
  • It can also interact with other medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
  • Cerenia is not recommended for use in dogs with certain medical conditions, such as liver or kidney disease.

Side Effects:

  • Drowsiness
  • Decreased appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Lethargy
  • Ataxia
  • Vomiting
  • Anorexia

Drug Interactions:

  • Cerenia can interact with other medications, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Contraindications:

  • Cerenia is not recommended for use in dogs with certain medical conditions, such as liver or kidney disease.

Research and Study:

  • Studies have shown that Cerenia is effective at reducing nausea and vomiting caused by various conditions, including motion sickness, gastritis, and chemotherapy.
  • Cerenia has been found to be well-tolerated in most dogs, with a low incidence of side effects.

Natural or OTC Veterinary Alternatives:

  • There are a variety of natural and over-the-counter options for treating vomiting in dogs, including ginger, vitamin B6, and probiotics.
  • However, it is important to consult with a veterinarian before using any alternative treatments, as some may not be suitable for certain dogs or conditions.
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Hannah Elizabeth is an English animal behavior author, having written for several online publications. With a degree in Animal Behaviour and over a decade of practical animal husbandry experience, Hannah's articles cover everything from pet care to wildlife conservation. When she isn't creating content for blog posts, Hannah enjoys long walks with her Rottweiler cross Senna, reading fantasy novels and breeding aquarium shrimp.

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