8 Dogs with Beards and Mustaches

When searching for your next family pet it is important to find a dog with the physical attributes that you were looking for. A dog is a long-term investment and will stay with your family for many years, so it is important to get a dog that looks the way you want.

Dogs are beautiful animals they come in many varieties with a plethora of different characteristics so narrowing in uninteresting qualities will help you decide which dog is best for you.

One of the most common characteristics that people search for in dogs is his added facial hair. Certain dogs have extra fur around the face that makes the dog look like they have a beard or mustache.

Bearded dogs can be aesthetically pleasing it can offer a unique option when it comes to your pet. Here are the best bearded dog breeds to get if you are looking for dogs with beards and mustaches.

Bearded Collie

Much like its name implies the bearded collie is a beautiful beard that wraps around the dog’s chin and flows perfectly into the rest of its long-haired coat. Affectionately called the beardie, this is a herding breed it was primarily used by Scottish shepherds.

The bearded collie can grow up to 60 pounds with a height of 22 inches. Bearded collies make for great family pets and have incredibly calm temperaments making them perfect with children. Bearded collies can come in a variety of colors but most of the black with white accents.

Airedale Terrier

The Airedale Terrier is a great option for our bearded dog if you have allergies. This breed of terrier is hypoallergenic and has short curly fur. The Airedale Terrier sports a tuft of hair under its chin that resembles a beautiful goatee.

The Airedale Terrier is traditionally called the King of terriers due to its size and history throughout England. These dogs can grow up to 24 inches tall and weigh up to 64 pounds. Airedale terriers are good hunting dogs, but also love the companionship of a family.

Scottish Terrier

A distant cousin to the Airedale Terrier is the Scottish terrier. This is a much smaller version, but much like the Airedale Terrier, the Scottish terrier is hypoallergenic. The Scottish terrier features long facial hair around the cheeks and snout giving the dog a bearded look. When groomed properly this dog’s beard can reach several inches in length giving it a very distinct look.

Scottish terriers on the grow to be about 22 pounds and 11 inches tall. Scottish terriers are often territorial and feisty and are traditionally rugged and determined. Scottish terriers are lovable it could be good with certain children, but they may be perfect for a couple or individual without kids.

Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier

The soft coated wheaten terrier is a great middle option right between the Airedale Terrier and the Scottish terrier. These dogs are traditionally from Ireland and feature one of two types of coats. The Irish coat features long wavy silky hair and the American coat is a bit thicker and a bit fuller.

No matter which coat your soft coated wheaten terrier has, its face will produce a beard. This terrier has a distinct goatee-like tuft of hair on his chin as well as longer hair around its snout that gives a fully bearded look. Soft-coated wheaten terriers can grow to be around 30 pounds and up to 20 inches tall. These terriers are great family dogs and tend to be affectionate and caring to children of all ages.

Yorkshire Terrier

The Yorkshire terrier is the smallest over the terriers coming in at a max size of 7 pounds. This tiny dog generally only grows to be 9 inches tall. The breed was developed in England and is hypoallergenic. If left to grow Yorkshire terriers can develop beautifully long beards that stem from the sides of their snout and their chin

. Some Yorkshire terriers can grow beards that even touch the ground. Yorkshire terriers are perfect if you live in a small living space and the breed varies between feisty and affectionate. Yorkshire terriers have a notorious issue with potty training and sensitivity to the cold, but if well cared for the Yorkshire terrier makes for a great pet.

Shih Tzu

The Shih Tzu is a breed of Tibetan descent that was created solely for companionship. It has a life expectancy of up to 16 years. These dogs grow long facial hairs alongside the snout and under the chin that are reminiscent of a mustache and goatee combo.

If groomed properly, a Shih Tzu’s beard can grow to several inches in length. The Shih Tzu is an affectionate breed that can get as big as 16 pounds. They make great pets for single people as well as decent family dogs.

Schnauzer

The schnauzer is a German breed of dog that is highly trainable and perfect for working conditions. They grow excessive hair around their face which has the look of a long luxurious beard. Many schnauzer’s beards are a different color than their normal coat giving them a very distinct and regal look. These dogs can get up to 44 pounds and set at a height of around 20 inches.

The schnauzer comes in three sizes: miniature, standard, and giant. All three sizes of this breed grow long and luxurious beards. The schnauzer is a great family dog as it takes well to training it is generally loyal and loving.

Old English Sheepdog

The old English sheepdog is a large breed of dog that was developed as a cousin of Scottish herding sheepdogs. This breed is the largest on the list as they can grow up to 100 pounds and as tall as 24 inches.

The old English sheepdog grows longer hair on the snout that if left untrimmed will form a beautiful facial hair across your dog’s cheeks. The old English sheepdog is a long-haired breed that is not hypoallergenic. The old English sheepdog maybe big, but it is also very loving. These dogs are bubbly and playful making them a perfect breed for your family.

There are many other dogs with beards out there. Most common dog breeds can grow a beard and it is just a matter of proper grooming to keep your dog with a beard looking good.

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Hannah Elizabeth is an English animal behavior author, having written for several online publications. With a degree in Animal Behaviour and over a decade of practical animal husbandry experience, Hannah's articles cover everything from pet care to wildlife conservation. When she isn't creating content for blog posts, Hannah enjoys long walks with her Rottweiler cross Senna, reading fantasy novels and breeding aquarium shrimp.

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